Dante Gabriel Rossetti Store

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A major poet, writer and painter, Dante Gabriel Rossetti was seen as the dominating cultural presence in the second half of the 19th century. He founded the Pre-Raphaelite movement, revised and re-imagined Blake's project of marrying images and texts, and was a shaping influence on Modernist aesthetic ideas and practices. His translations are original poetical works in their own right. Jerome McGann, scholar of the 19th and 20th century, presents a selection of Rossetti's poetry, prose and original translations. The collection is accompanied by McGann's commentaries and notes.
Dante Gabriel Rossetti was born on May 12th 1828 in London, England. The young Gabriel Charles Dante Rossetti was the son of émigré Italian scholar Gabriele Pasquale Giuseppe Rossetti and his wife Frances Polidori. To family and friends he was Gabriel, but in print he put the name Dante first (in honour of Dante Alighieri). It was an artistic family of siblings; he was the brother of famed poet Christina Rossetti, critic William Michael Rossetti, and author Maria Francesca Rossetti. During his early years Rossetti was home educated and spent hours immersed reading the Bible, Shakespeare, Dic...
This Is A New Release Of The Original 1896 Edition.
Dante Gabriel Rossetti was born on May 12th 1828 in London, England. The young Gabriel Charles Dante Rossetti was the son of émigré Italian scholar Gabriele Pasquale Giuseppe Rossetti and his wife Frances Polidori. To family and friends he was Gabriel, but in print he put the name Dante first (in honour of Dante Alighieri). It was an artistic family of siblings; he was the brother of famed poet Christina Rossetti, critic William Michael Rossetti, and author Maria Francesca Rossetti. During his early years Rossetti was home educated and spent hours immersed reading the Bible, Shakespeare, Dic...
The House of Life is a poetic work that spans the life and loves of the founding member of the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood, Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Exploring the passion and ardour he felt for his wife, and later the wife of his friend and business partner, William Morris, The House of Life is an exploration of self, existence and love.
This edition features the beautiful oil paintings and pastel drawings of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, with an easy to navigate index of all the poems.
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La Vita Nuova (Italian for "The New Life") or Vita Nova (Latin title) is a text by Dante Alighieri published in 1295. It is an expression of the medieval genre of courtly love in a prosimetrum style, a combination of both prose and verse. Besides its content, it is notable for being written in Italian, rather than Latin; with Dante's other works, it helped to establish the Tuscan dialect as the standard for the Italian language.
In its response to a distinct revival of interest in Pre-Raphaelite painting, much biographical attention has been focused on members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and on Dante Gabriel Rossetti in particular. Rossetti's poetry, however, received comparatively scant attention, and that often far from sympathetic. This 1981 book aims to provide the basis for a better understanding and a juster appreciation of his poetic achievement. The main emphasis of the book is on Rossetti's distinctive imaginative world and the body of imagery which creates it; throughout there are close analyses of the...
Poet and painter, founder and acknowledged leader of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-1882) has beguiled and intrigued for more than a century with his turbulent and romantic imagery. This beautifully illustrated book analyzes the life and career of this influential English painter. 63 illustrations, 53 in color.
Dante’s putative subject is Beatrice/Love—but the Vita Nuova is really an exercise in poetry: Dante sets the emotional scene for a poem, then he writes the poem, then he explains the poem’s structure, part by part. The work shows what we recognize today as a literary attitude, a critical stance on a piece of writing. His precision in thinking about how thoughts ought to be organized may seem pedantic, yet this is the mind that later engaged the question of what Hell might look like, and why and how, not from a religious point of view but as an extended imaginative venture.

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